HydroMAN

About HydroMAN

HydroMAN, which standards for hydrodynamic model-aided navigation, is a state-of-the-art navigation engine primarily designed for autonomous underwater vehicles. HydroMAN was originally developed to demonstrate the ability to accurately navigate underwater vehicles under the ice in the Arctic. This was demonstrated at the US navy ICEX20 conducted in the Arctic Beaufort Sea, where the MIT team deployed the Macrura AUV, a custom Bluefin 21 vehicle - Macrura was the first Bluefin 21 vehicle, originally referred to as the Bluefin Odyssey III, Caribou. The original purpose of HydroMAN was to accurately navigate Macrura underneath drifting Arctic sea ice in the upper and mid-water columns without DVL bottom-lock, and with the ability to withstand DVL ice-lock dropouts, acoustic communication/navigation-aid dropouts and delays and time-lags in acoustic navigation-aid.

The HydroMAN synthesized measurements from a navigation grade INS, upward-looking DVL, pressure sensor, self-calibrating vehicle flight dynamic model, and acoustic navigation updates from our custom integrated communication and navigation network, ICNN. Anticipating wind and current driven ice movement, the ICNN regularly updated the AUV with ice drift position and velocity measurements; HydroMAN corrected the DVL measurements accordingly. The vehicle flight dynamic model synthesized the corrected DVL ice-track measurements and ICNN navigation updates, when available, to self-calibrate the vehicle dynamic model to the local operating environment, largely compensating for the drift provided by underwater currents and the model's own error estimate. The calibrated vehicle model was then utilized for navigation aiding when DVL ice-lock was unavailable.

At ICEX20, HydroMAN-ICNN navigation framework demonstrated the capability of providing a non-diverging navigation solution with an uncertainty in the low tens of meters, which is similar to the GPS accuracy in high latitudes.

HydroMAN 2.0

Currently the primary HydroMAN 2.0 source code lives in an MIT github repository. A mirror image of this repository also exists in github.com for the purpose of providing read-write access to external users, and read-only access to vehicle computers. Please contact Supun Randeni [supun@mit.edu] or The Laboratory for Autonomous Marine Sensing Systems [lamss@mit.edu] to obtain access to these repositories.